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Bitcoin Drops 7.46%, Falls To $18,915

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iPhoneBitcoin dropped 7.46% on Saturday, falling to $18,915.29. With this fall, Bitcoin lost $1,525.41 from its previous close.

The biggest and best-known cryptocurrency is down 60.8% from the year’s high of $48,234 on March 28.

It fell below the threshold of $20,000 for the first time since 2020, indicating that the selloff in increasing.

Also, at some points during the day, it even fell below $18,000.

ALSO READ: SpaceX Sacks Employees Who Wrote Letter Criticizing Elon Musk

In 2020, Bitcoin fell below $20,000. Meanwhile, after that 2020 fall, many stakeholders believed it would never fall below that mark again.

This was because, the cryptocurrency was coating high to nearly $69,000.

Bitcoin has now lost more than 70% of its value since reaching its peak.

Also, Ethereum, the coin linked to the ethereum blockchain network, dropped 8.84 % to $988.52 on Saturday, losing $95.9 from its previous close.

The cryptocurrency industry has seen turmoil amid wider turbulence in financial markets — this past week was Wall Street’s worst since 2020, during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic.

Investors are selling off riskier assets because central banks are raising interest rates to combat quickening inflation.

Higher rates can help bring down inflation, but they also heighten the chances of a recession by increasing borrowing costs for consumers and businesses and pushing down prices for stocks, and other investments like cryptocurrencies.

 

The overall market value of cryptocurrency assets has fallen from $3 trillion to less than $1 trillion, according to coinmarketcap.com, which tracks crypto prices. As of Saturday afternoon the company’s data showed crypto’s global market value stood at about $816 billion.

A spate of cryptocurrency meltdowns has sparked urgent calls to regulate the freewheeling industry, and last week bipartisan legislation was introduced in the U.S. Senate to regulate the digital assets. The industry has also upped its lobbying efforts, flooding $20 million into congressional races this year for the first time, according to records and interviews.

Cesare Fracassi, a finance professor at the University of Texas at Austin who leads the school’s Blockchain Initiative, believes bitcoin’s fall under the psychological threshold isn’t a big deal. Instead, he said the focus should be on recent news from lending platforms.

One of them, Celsius Network, said this month that it was pausing all withdrawals and transfers, with no sign of when it would give its 1.7 million customers access to their funds. Another platform, Babel Finance, said in a notice posted online Friday that it would suspend redemptions and withdrawals on products due to “unusual liquidity pressures.”

“There is a lot of turbulence in the market,” Fracassi said. “And the reason why prices are going down is because there is a lot of concern the sector is overleveraged.”

Cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase announced Tuesday that it had laid off about 18% of its workforce, with CEO and cofounder Brian Armstrong placing some of the blame on a coming “crypto winter.”

Stablecoin Terra imploded last month, losing tens of billions of dollars in value in a matter of hours.

Crypto had permeated much of popular culture before its recent tumble, with Super Bowl ads touting the digital assets and celebrities and YouTube personalities routinely promoting it on social media.

David Gerard, a crypto critic and author of “Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain,” said the recent meltdowns show a failure by regulators, who he believes should have put more scrutiny on the industry years ago.

Many nascent investors — especially young people — invested based on a false hope that was sold to them, he said: “There are real human victims here that are ordinary people.

Alex Diaz, the administrator of a Facebook group for Bitcoin enthusiasts, said he believes the bitcoin crash is not the fault of bitcoin but of parallel developments in the cryptocurrency space, some of which are “just schemes or outright scams.”

“What it will take to recover is just time,” Diaz said.

Chan reported from London. Associated Press journalist Leah Willingham in Charleston, West Virginia, contributed to this report.

Source: NYTimes

Anthony Chinonso Ogbonna is the editor of Techuncode media. He is a seasoned journalist whose stint cuts across broadcast, print and, especially, the online media. A graduate of Mass Communication from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka (UNN), Anthony holds a Masters Degree in Multimedia Journalism. He aligns his belief with those of world tech communities, holding tenaciously that the world is solely driven and can only be best with tech. Furthermore, Anthony believes that technology is simple, fun and is not what one, especially Africans, should be scared of, hence, his passion for telling compelling stories about tech in ways relatable to the ordinary user. He has his hobbies in reading and designing (new hobby though.)

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