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Disney Adds Strong Disclaimer To Movies With Racist Stereotypes

Precious Akinkugbe

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Disney Plus now adds strong disclaimer to movies with racist stereotypes

Disney has added a strong warning to some of its movies with racist content, as viewers will now be warned about clips that portray “negative depictions” of specific peoples.

The warning also includes wrong portrayals of certain cultures.

The warning lasts for 12 seconds on the screens as it can’t be skipped.

Although the movies themselves don’t include any warnings, Disney makes sure to do it for them.

Old animated classics like Peter Pan of 1953 and Dumbo of 1941 are examples of movies that carry the disclaimer.

The movies have remained over time with content that portrays culture and people negatively.

The warning says the racist depictions are wrong now and were wrong then.

Instead of removing the content, Disney wants to admit its damaging impact.

Disney also wants to comprehend it and create conversations around it so the future can be more inclusive.

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Asides, Dumbo and Peter Pan, Aladdin of 1992 and Aristocrats of 1970 also carry the warning.

Disney also directs the audience to a site that describes controversial content.

The page is called “Stories Matter,” and it details Disney’s third part advisory members.

According to Disney, the third party advisory supports the entertainment media to increase “cultural competency.”

The advisory consists of the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment and African-American Film Critics Association.

It also consists of the Science and Entertainment Exchange and GLAAD Media Institute.

The warning by Disney is similar to the one used in 2019.

It communicates that the program is originally created and is made up of outdated portrayals.

Most of the movies with the warnings carry disturbing racist distortions.

Information about the racist caricature can be found on the Stories Matter site.

‘Danger for kids’

Professor at Wisconsin Madison, Hemant Shah, studied ethnicity and racism in media and film.

She states that if kids feed on such racist content, they might take it as normal.

They then might get comfy with racist behaviours in their day to day lives.

Prof. Shah also added that it could cause low esteem issues for children who believe such portrayals are who they are.

He further added that racist clips provided learning opportunities for children watching with supervision.

Disney should also have an education scheme about racist content in line with the warning, he said.

On the other hand, how possible is it that kids will pause to read the disclaimer, long or not?

Most likely, with that in mind, Disney has put a hold on Song of the South’s release.

It’ll be impossible to justify the content of Song of the South with the strongest of disclaimers.

SEE VIDEO:

Disney is still trying to erase Song of the South from its memory with a fresh remake, Splash Mountain Ride.

Splash Mountain Ride includes songs and characters from Song of the South and The Princess and the Frog.

Brands take responsibility

Disney’s warnings come at the foot of brands coming to terms with racist additions to their products.

The Aunt Jemima brand by Quaker Oats will now change the picture on its package.

A person who was enslaved before was gotten to act like Aunt Jemima in the 1800s.

By the 1930s, a white actress who acted as blackface also acted in a radio show as Aunt Jemima.

The Cream of Wheat company also stopped the black chef on the package.

The acting was based on fears that they might be contributing to systematic racism.

According to the company, the picture brings back offensive memories with negative portrayals to some consumers.

Let us know what you think about racism in movies in the comment section.

Precious Akinkugbe is a Video Producer at Techuncode, where she scripts and creates videos that are published across all the social platforms. She is also a radical writer and founder of "The Book Club," a small team of bibliophiles who spend their free time drowning between revolutionary pages. As far as hobbies go, she'll pick sitting in a room full of dogs over watching movies any day. Precious finds peace in travelling and exploring the world. Maybe you can go on a trip with her someday.

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